Thursday, April 19, 2007

Cho Seung-Hui died for somebody's sins, but not mine

Cho Seung-Hui's "manifesto" speaks of "martyrs like Eric [Harris] and Dylan [Klebold]." He fantasized that he was dying "like Jesus Christ, to inspire generations of the weak and the defenseless people," his "brothers and sisters and children."

Well, I am his brother. I was a high school loser. I was one of the weak and defenseless. Maybe I wasn't that different from him once upon a time. But Cho Seung-Hui didn't die for me.

He didn't die for anyone or anything but his own weakness and twisted fantasies. Harris and Klebold weren't martyrs, they were pathetic losers just like every other school shooter that's ever been. The only difference between them and people like Kip Kinkel or any of the others you've seen weeping and whining in TV interviews is that they died. That's all. If they'd lived, they'd have been exposed for what they really were, instead of allowing deluded children to imagine that they're martyrs.

If you don't fit in, if you're bullied, if you're an outcast, there's nothing "inspiring" about dressing up in cheesy pseudo-military clothes and posing for photos like you're a tough guy and killing helpless people because of your own weakness. There's nothing heroic about it. No, real heroism is finding the courage to live. Real heroism is finding ways to change yourself. Real heroism is reaching out to other people. Real heroism is getting help. Real heroism is not letting "them" define you. Real heroism is making a life for yourself after high school.

And there are thousands -- millions -- of heroes just like that in America and every other country in this world. They've overcome, or at least learned to live with, the scars of their youth. They've learned to live, to love, to keep on trying. They, not those who embrace death, are the heroes. They, not the murderous and not the suicidal, are the ones who inspire. I know this. I know, because I'm one of them.

3 comments:

  1. My daughter is writing a paper about bullying. I was glad that she empasized speaking out, getting help, not letting it continue happening to you or to others. It's important for kids to know that they don't have to--nor should they--take it upon themselves to avenge.

    MrsD

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  2. Screw you.Eric and Dylan have followers all over the world.
    They are heros and have been heros to a whole subculture of people out there.
    That will never change.
    You are clueless.You obviously didn't get bullied that badly or you would understand why some people strike out and lash back.
    The world is full of assholes like you.
    Thats the simpliest explanation as to why school shootings happen.

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  3. Of course I understand why people lash back. You think I never thought about shooting up my high school? And at least I was original, because in my day nobody had done it yet.

    But there would have been nothing "heroic" about it if I had. Taking out my pain and weakness on other people, most of them innocent? That's just sorry.

    You want to be a hero? Then survive. Live. That's what takes courage. Because once you get away from them, it does get better.

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